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One Year No Beer | Hack your healthy Lifestyle

The OneYearNoBeer Podcast will inspire you to take, or support your journey on a 30, 90 & 365 day challenge to stop drinking and focus on healthy habits.
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One Year No Beer | Hack your healthy Lifestyle
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May 29, 2019

The stories of One Year No Beer members themselves can be some of the most powerful and compelling evidence for people who want to learn about how One Year No Beer works. On today’s episode, you’ll hear one of those personal stories from Sharon Hartley, a One Year No Beer member who joined eight months ago. 

Sharon is a married mother of three from Lancashire. She has a background in broadcast journalism, and says that she got used to the culture of parties and freebies when she was working in radio. She used to be a regular drinker – the first to arrive at a party and the last to leave – who preferred rose wine and vodka with red bull.

“Be brave and be bold and do what you’ve got to do.” 

Sharon says that she didn’t have a dramatic experience of hitting bottom before she signed up for One Year No Beer. She just found that more and more of her life was revolving around alcohol, and that it was causing conflict within her family. She also found that she was becoming bored of drinking. She enjoys a challenge and pushing herself outside of her comfort zone, and that instinct led her to One Year No Beer. 

Originally, Sharon signed up for a 28-day challenge, and she was skeptical when other members told her that she’d see more of a difference when she went for 60 days or 90 days, but she didn’t believe it at first. However, the further she took her challenge, the more she found that to be true. Sharon explains that it was hard at first, and even scary to try to go without alcohol. It was hard to think past the next party or next weekend and people would ask her why she wasn’t drinking and what was wrong. 

However, over time, she got accustomed to it and also started seeing the benefits of going alcohol-free. She says she has more time to spend with the kids, spends more time doing new things like running and mountain climbing, and has even signed up for her first Spartan event. She is also seeing the health benefits of giving up alcohols. She sleeps better and has more energy for the gym, more mental clarity, and better skin. 

Sharon says that one of the ways to avoid drinking in the beginning is to remove yourself from situations where you’ll be tempted to drink – it helps not to go to a bar or a party on your first alcohol-free weekend. She also says that it helps to remember that you’re not necessarily removing alcohol from your life forever, just for long enough to change your relationship with it. Her advice for people who are considering joining OYNB or taking an alcohol-free challenge is to just jump in with both feet and don’t wait. There will always be a reason not to do it, so it’s better to make up your mind that you’re going to do it and go for it.

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

Email: info@oneyearnobeer.com

 

Apr 24, 2019

In today’s episode of the One Year No Beer Podcast, Ruari is trying out a new format. Rather than interviewing a guest, Ruari is going to spend some time talking about the community and some of the things that are going on with the OYNB community and its members. 

First of all, Ruari shares some updates from the OYNB HQ, including the fact that OYNB has expanded to about 16 full-time members of the team. There’s also a new community manager, and OYNB members should expect to see some big changes over the next three months. 

“It’s an interesting journey, this changing your relationship with alcohol. It’s different for everybody.” 

Ruari also mentions that he’s noticed several people sharing stories of grief and personal loss in the community recently. He talks about how his experience with grief was to continue down the same destructive path that he was on before. Ruari believes that this is not unusual – heavy drinking is a common element of funerals and wakes, for example. But as Ruari points out, alcohol is a depressant, and adding it to a situation that’s already upsetting can cause a person to spiral. 

Ruari believes that the answer is to really get in touch with your feelings and find a safe space in which to feel them. He recommends a book, Focusing by Eugene Gendlin, that was recommended to him by a counselor in his youth and that he believes can help people trying to get in touch with their feelings. 

Ruari suggests contacting the Samaritans (at 116 123 in the UK) for people who are in need of someone to talk to. He also reminds listeners that they can contact info@oneyearnobeer.com for help and that they’re planning to relaunch their coaching program very soon. 

Ruari believes that connections are an important part of the answer to dealing with addictions, as well as an important part of the One Year No Beer mission. He explains that OYNB is heavily invested in their partnership with Spartan, and they’re going to have a presence at every Spartan in the UK, as well as some in the US. The next upcoming Spartan is in early May and will be held in Kent, and OYNB will be there with a tent, providing an excellent opportunity for members of the OYNB community to meet and make connections. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

Email: info@oneyearnobeer.com

Apr 17, 2019

If you or someone close to you has ever tried to give up alcohol for a stretch of time, you know that it can be a challenge, and hitting an anniversary or another milestone is a real achievement. Have you ever wanted to celebrate a sober achievement with someone? If so, you may have looked for a greeting card to commemorate the occasion – and if you did that, you probably noticed that there weren’t many choices. Today’s guest made that very discovery, then decided to do something about it. 

Lucy Wilkins and her business partner Sara Bender both had people in their lives who had struggled with drinking. When Lucy went looking for a greeting card to celebrate her loved one’s 100 days sober, she was temporarily stymied when she couldn’t find what she was looking for. When she talked it over with Sara, they decided to start making their own cards for the sober space. Their company is called We Are In Good Co. 

“We’re just saying, just make space for the people those cards aren’t relevant or appropriate for.  Just make space for the sober cards.”

Lucy explains that attitudes around sobriety are changing and younger people are more likely to be open and celebrate their sobriety, where older generations are more likely to hold their sober status close to the vest. 

As Lucy points out, sobriety doesn’t necessarily have to be a response to addiction or bad experiences with alcohol – going alcohol-free is a lifestyle choice, and many people choose it because they prefer it or because it’s healthier. 

Lucy and Sara have run into some challenges distributing their cards because some people assume that their niche is too small. However, they believe that the sober niche is growing, and the feedback they receive suggests that there are people out there searching for the type of fun, sober greetings offered by We Are In Good Co. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/ 

LUCY WILKINS’ LINKS & RESOURCES 

We Are In Good Co.: https://weareingood.co/

We Are In Good Co. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weareingoodco/

We Are In Good Co. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/weareingoodcom

Apr 10, 2019

Joining the One Year No Beer podcast today is Eric Edmeades, a true serial entrepreneur. Over the past 20 years, Eric has started, bought, sold, and turned around businesses in 6 different countries. He’s also a speaker who has spent more than 10,000 hours on stages across 20 countries, and a trailblazer in the food revolution. 

In today’s interview, Eric explains how he ended up becoming a serial entrepreneur. His story begins with graduating high school and not having the means to go to college – he had to go straight into the workforce instead. A bad experience early on resulted in Eric taking his future into his own hands and creating his first business.

“The more intense your emotional response to the idea that you need to be taking a break from alcohol, the more you need to be taking a little bit of a break from alcohol.” 

Eric’s nutrition program WildFit is the culmination of years of interest in diet and nutritional anthropology. As a teenager and into his early 20s, Eric struggled with allergies, acne, digestive issues, and other problems. Eventually, he was able to turn his health problems around with diet. WildFit is Eric’s effort to share what he’s learned with others. He has a passion for helping adults and children achieve optimal health through diet. 

Eric explains that WildFit is not a weight loss program, but that it is effective at helping overweight participants to lose weight. People who successfully use WildFit range from ordinary people who are simply overweight or lacking energy to high-performance athletes to people struggling with serious health conditions like diabetes and cancer. 

WildFit asks participants to change their relationship with food, and with alcohol as well. The idea is to make long-term, lasting dietary changes that lead to a healthier life overall. Eric is looking forward to moving WildFit to a more mainstream audience. There is currently a docu-series in development that will chronicle the entire journey through the program. Eric will also be doing a webinar with One Year No Beer for people interested in the WildFit program. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/ 

 

ERIC EDMEADES’ LINKS & RESOURCES 

Eric’s Website: https://ericedmeades.com/

WildFit: https://getwildfit.com/

Apr 4, 2019

Giving up alcohol and other substances can help clear your mind and allow you to see things that you couldn’t see before. But once that’s accomplished, what do you do? What are your gifts? What’s your purpose? Today’s guest knows something about how you can find out. 

Kitty Waters spent years working in the city in a recruitment business, and while she may have looked successful during that time, she wasn’t happy. Kitty had a nervous breakdown at 22, precipitated by an affair, and while she sought help, she didn’t really make the kinds of changes that would lead to long-term happiness. Instead, she masked her feelings with binge-drinking and cocaine use. Her wakeup call wouldn’t come until she reached the age of 28, when she discovered a family history of depression amidst her mother’s depressive crisis and suicide attempt. 

“I kind of covered up my pain and my chronic depression with drug and alcohol problems.”

In an effort to give up the drinking and drugs, Kitty seized on a challenge. She joined a personal development group and decided to participate in group trip to Kilimanjaro. Training to climb a mountain replaced alcohol and drugs. 

It was on the mountain that Kitty became inspired to begin her own organization. Kitty’s 8-week online course, Do Your Dharma, is based around the concept of dharma from Vedic texts, where dharma means the right path of action for the individual and for humanity at the same time. 

Kitty explains that her course is meant to help people reconnect to their true selves, discover their purpose in life, and create a vision for what their life is going to be going forward. She explains that in the philosophy of dharma, each person is unique, and it’s each individual’s job to discover their own passions. Listen to the episode to hear more about Kitty’s story and her organization. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/ 

KITTY WATERS’S LINKS & RESOURCES 

Kitty’s Website: https://kittywaters.com/home

 

Mar 20, 2019

On today’s episode of One Year, No Beer, guest Rob Fink will be joining the podcast to talk about alcohol-free, nonalcoholic, and 0.5% beers. Rob Fink is the founder and CEO of Big Drop Brewing. However, he wasn’t always the founder of a brewing company. Rob is a lawyer by trade, and when he and another lawyer set up their office in a city, Rob had to go out and meet with clients to bring in business. This meant meetings in pubs and bars and led to a lot of drinking. When Rob’s son was born, he decided to give up alcohol for a while and quit drinking for seven months. However, he still wanted to be able to enjoy a beverage when he was out. 

Rob found himself bored with the nonalcoholic options available in local establishments. He prefers to drink stouts, and couldn’t find nonalcoholic stouts offered anywhere. This gap in the market was what gave him the idea to begin his own brewing company. 

“I scoured the bars, scoured the internet, and I just could not find anybody, dare I say in the world, who was making an alcohol-free stout. And I just thought, why not?” 

In today’s interview, Rob describes more about the process of making low-alcohol beer and the different styles of beer that Big Drop Brewing Company makes. He also talks about why the beer is labeled low-alcohol or .05% alcohol. As Rob explains, beer cannot be called alcohol-free in the UK unless it has 0.05% alcohol or less. However, it’s impossible to make 0.05% beer using the normal brewing process. Therefore, in the UK, Big Drip Brewing beer that has 0.5% alcohol must be labeled low-alcohol instead. However, in the EU, 0.5% alcohol beer is classed as alcohol-free, and in Canada, 0.5% alcohol is called nonalcoholic. As Rob points out, at 0.5% AVB, it’s nearly impossible to drink enough to reach the legal drinking while driving limit. 

Rob also talks about his own experience going alcohol-free. He says that he lost about 10 kilos in seven months, slept better, and felt generally healthier during the seven months when he gave up alcohol. He’s now beginning One Year No Beer’s 365 challenge, and he says that it’s helpful to know that he can now give up alcohol while still enjoying a great-tasting low-alcohol beer. He also shares details about how his business has expanded over the previous year, and where Big Drop Brewing Company’s beers may be found in the future. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

ROB FINK’S LINKS & RESOURCES

 Big Drop Brewing Co.: https://www.bigdropbrew.com/

Where to Buy Big Drop Brewing Beer: https://www.bigdropbrew.com/where-to-buy

Feb 27, 2019

One thing that can be seen over and over again is that changing the way you incorporate alcohol into your life, whether that means quitting drinking entirely or simply becoming more mindful about when and where you choose to drink, can have a big positive impact on your overall health. People often describe feeling more energetic and clear-headed when they give up alcohol. But why stop there? Changing your diet can also have a big impact on your health. Today’s guest has expert information on the benefits of switching to a whole food plant-based diet. 

Dr. Alan Desmond is a Consultant Gastroenterologist certified in Gastroenterology and General Internal Medicine. For years, Dr. Desmond has helped patients with a variety of digestive problems, including coeliac disease, diverticular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. 

“All of the medical evidence is really pointing us toward the fact that the more whole foods and plant-based foods you consume on a daily basis, the better. It’s a win-win.” 

Additionally, Dr. Desmond is an Advisory Board Member of Plant-based Health Professionals UK, a charity that educated doctors, Health Professionals and members of the public on the health benefits of a plant-based diet. He can often be found on Instagram, answering questions and sharing pictures of delicious plant-based meals, complete with cooking instructions and interesting scientific information about the food. 

In today’s interview, Dr. Desmond talks about how the body is affected by diet and why medical science suggests that a whole food plant-based diet is the best choice for the body. He explains how this type of diet helps to maintain the gut microbiome, and how beneficial gut bacteria can help keep the body healthy and aid digestion. 

Dr. Desmond also talks about his new venture, the Happy Gut Course. This is a project that was launched in January 2019 in partnership with dietician Rosie Martin and plant-based chefs Stephen and David Flynn of The Happy Pear. The Happy Gut is a 6-week online course that teaches students about the gut health benefits of a whole food plant-based diet. Students will have access to recipes, meal plans, shopping lists, educational modules, live Q&A's and online support. Listen to the episode to hear more about Dr. Desmond’s work. ONYB members who want to enroll in The Happy Gut Course can use a special coupon code, ONYB20, for 20% off. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/ 

ALAN DESMOND’S LINKS & RESOURCES 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/devongutdoctor/?hl=en

The Happy Gut Course: https://courses.thehappypear.ie/happy-gut/

Free Happy Gut Guide: https://thehappypear.ie/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/THE-HAPPY-GUT-GUIDE.pdf

Feb 13, 2019

Changing your relationship with alcohol changes a lot of other things as well, including the way you related to other people. And when it comes to dating, cutting out or limiting alcohol can be a dramatic change, because so many date scenarios include – or are even centered around – alcohol. Today’s guest brings an important perspective to the conversation around alcohol-free dating.

Dalya Heron Brook is a Transformational Coach who has a special focus on dating and intimate relationships. She works as a professional matchmaker with Asprey Introductions and is featured on the television show The Ultimate Matchmaker, in addition to her work as a coach.

“You definitely, definitely create more opportunity for yourself, in my opinion, by going on a date sober. Even if you are a drinker.”

In today’s episode, Dalya talks about her work and how she became a Transformational coach after an intensive 3-year course of study with her own coach, in addition to studying with other wellness gurus. Dalya explains that eschewing alcohol in a dating situation can help by bringing more clarity to the situation, which can help you make more informed decisions.

Dalya acknowledges that it can be awkward to talk to a date about not drinking and choosing activities that don’t involve drinking. However, she points out that this can be a way of weeding out potential dates who are inclined to be judgmental of your choices. What’s more, she explains that revealing your decision to avoid alcohol can be a bonding moment, as you’re showing a willingness to be vulnerable.

Dalya goes on to talk about how being alcohol-free can affect intimate situations. She explains that alcohol suppresses the nervous system, preventing you from feeling as much physical. She points out that without alcohol to suppress your physical sensations, physical intimacy can be a more sensual experience.

Dalya also talks about the book she’s working on, which is about evolving through the break-up process. Dalya believes that a break-up is a painful moment, but also a powerful one. In her book, she is exploring the different phases of a break-up, as well as including information about self-care and coaching.

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

DALYA’S LINKS & RESOURCES

Website: https://dalyaheronbrook.com/about-dalya-heron-brook/

Email: dalya@dalyaheronbrook.com

Jan 30, 2019

It’s easy to imagine the world in black and white terms, especially when it comes to things like alcohol use. However, there are always gray areas, and questioning your drinking doesn’t necessarily mean that you need rehab or AA. It doesn’t necessarily mean that you should keep drinking the way you are now, either. Today’s guest calls this “sober curiosity.”

Ruby Warrington is a British writer who currently lives and works in New York. She was the former Features Editor of the UK Sunday Times Style supplement. She is the Founder of The Numinous, and the author of two books: Material Girl, Mystical World: The New Age Guide to a High Vibe Life, and Sober Curious: The Blissful Sleep, Laser Focus, Limitless Presence, and Deep Connection Awaiting Us All on the Other Side of Alcohol. Ruby is also the co-founder of an online spiritual mentoring program Moon Club and the “sober curious” events series Club SÖDA (Sober Or Debating Abstinence) NYC.

“For me, ultimately removing substances is cultivating more presence in my life.”

In today’s episode, Ruby talks about her experiences both before and after changing her relationship with alcohol. She describes dealing with mounting anxiety, unhappiness, and a feeling of purposelessness, despite her successful career in media, and she talks about making the decision to move to New York in the middle of this existential crisis.

Ruby said that she’d checked out AA in the past, but that the stories there didn’t reflect her own experiences with alcohol. She knew that there must be others like her, and that’s why she partnered with a meditation coach and began arranging events for the sober curious.

Ruby also talks about triggers and FOMA (Fear of Missing Alcohol) that people might experience at events when they’re trying to avoid drinking themselves. Ruby explains that her best advice is to accept and acknowledge your feelings, but don’t avoid the situations. Allow yourself to feel whatever you feel, then keep going, and remember that most other people in the room would feel the same way if the alcohol were removed. Listen to the episode to hear more about Ruby and her work.

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

RUBY’S LINKS & RESOURCES

WEBSITES
www.the-numinous.com
www.rubywarrington.com
www.clubsoda.nyc

INSTAGRAM
www.instagram.com/rubywarrington
www.instagram.com/the_numinous

FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/groups/clubsodanyc/
https://www.facebook.com/thenuminousmagazine/

Dec 11, 2018

Things are happening at One Year No Beer HQ. Before introducing today’s guest, Ruari has an update about some recent fundraising activities and about some of the changes and growth coming to ONYB. Keep an eye out for some new and exciting things coming in 2019. And now that the holiday season is underway, new listeners to ONYB may want to go back and look at older podcasts from around this type of year for tips, tricks, and advice to help you handle alcohol-free Christmas and holiday parties and ways to have a fun and festive season without alcohol.

Today’s guest is Ajit Nawalkha. Ajit is a speaker, coach, author, and entrepreneur who co-founded Mindvalley Teach and the Global Grit Institute. In today’s discussion, Ajit describes his background growing up in Jaipur in a household of 23 people. Ajit talks about how he began joining organizations that promised opportunities for growth and learning and began to interact with international communities. Ajit started a social network in India before Facebook was available in India, and he talks about what that experience was like.

“What has happened in the modern times is we have become so obsessed with creating a living that we have forgotten to live a life.”

Ajit talks about his book, The Book of Coaching. He explains how he noticed that coaches who could be very helpful to other people were often left behind themselves, especially financially. Ajit wanted to find a way to change that. He discovered that while there was a lot of talk about education for coaches, there was a lack of powerful conduct that focused on fundamentals aimed at coaches.

Ajit says that there are three things that coaches need to know. The first is that they have to work on themselves constantly because all business is personal. The second is that they need to have a solid methodology. The third is that coaching is not something you do freelance. It’s a business and should be treated like one. These ideas were what formed the basis of his book for coaches.

Ajit also talks about Mindvalley, the educational platform that he helped create that offers a new and different way to access education. He also talks about Evercoach, a platform for coaches that allows them to connect with each other and with experts and entrepreneurs to learn about business and make changes in their own business models. Finally, Ajit talks about his newest book, Live Big. Live Big discusses 3 elements that Ajit believes can help entrepreneurs, coaches, and experts to expand their businesses, increase their profits, and do good in the world. Listen to the episode to hear more about Ajit’s businesses, books, and personal story.

LINKS & RESOURCES

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer


AJIT’S LINKS & RESOURCES

Ajit Nawalkha: https://www.ajitnawalkha.com/

The Book of Coaching: For Extraordinary Coaches: https://www.amazon.com/Book-Coaching-Extraordinary-Coaches/dp/0999366505

Live Big: https://www.globalgritinstitute.com/live-big/

Mindvalley: https://www.mindvalley.com/

Mindvalley YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg3F5jxUrSvJQICen48cX4w

Ajit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ajitnawalkha/?hl=en

Ajit on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajitnawalkhaofficial/

Ajit on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ajitnawalkha

Dec 6, 2018

Weekends can be tough. For people who struggle with their habits around alcohol consumption, weekends can be especially difficult because of the way they feel after drinking too much on Friday or Saturday nights. Today’s guest understands what it’s like to struggle with Sundays. Emma Mainoo is the founder of the mental health platform Surviving Sundays. The platform came about because of Emma’s own struggle with her mental health. She notes that Sundays were usually her hardest days.

“In my case, I was for years, hiding the fact that I wasn’t quite OK. I wasn’t being authentic and that in itself, whatever you’re hiding from will come and get you in the end, in one way or another, I believe.”

In today’s episode, Emma talks about her experiences, and about the importance of being authentic and truthful with yourself and others. We discuss the comfort available in sharing stories with others, and how encouraging it can be to learn that others have similar stories and experiences.

Emma also discusses her own relationship with alcohol. She shares that she plans on starting an alcohol-free challenge in the new year, and talks about the difficulty of deciding whether to start with a 28-day challenge or a 90-day challenge. She also talks about her previous alcohol-free experiences. Emma says that when she posts about alcohol on her site or on Instagram, those posts get the most interactions in terms of likes, comments, and DMs, but that it’s also common to lose followers over posts about alcohol. This shows what a sensitive and important subject it can be. Listen to the episode to hear more about Emma and Surviving Sundays.

LINKS & RESOURCES

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer


EMMA’S LINKS & RESOURCES

Surviving Sundays: https://www.survivingsundays.com/

Surviving Sundays on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/surviving_sundays/

Surviving Sundays on Twitter: https://twitter.com/survivesundays

Nov 20, 2018

Will Polston is an award-winning mindset strategist and the founder of Make It Happen, an organization that works to help its clients gain clarity, take action, stay accountable, and make a difference as they make their way to the lifestyle that they want. He’s worked with celebrities, athletes, business owners, and regular people at low points in their life to help them reach the goals that they wanted to achieve.

Will was on a mission to find success when he got into the field of personal development, but he found that working in personal development allowed him to do something more important than just making money – it allowed him to help people as well.

“I believe we do more for others than we do for ourselves.”  

In today’s interview, Will talks about his decision to give up alcohol, and why he decided to do so. Will wants to pay his mother the money that she would need to retire, and he believes that he’ll reach that goal faster if he isn’t drinking. He describes how, when he was drinking on the weekends, he would go back to work on Monday, but not feel back up to 100% productivity until Friday. He believes that drinking was stopping him from working to his full potential. He decided in May to give up drinking for at least a year. Will believes that it can be easier to follow through with a tough decision if you’re doing it for someone else, rather than yourself, and he even gave a Ted Talk on this subject.

Will also talks about the event that he has coming up in December, The Personal Development Event of the Year. This will be a gathering of a number of respected and authoritative names in the personal development field. One Year No Beer podcast listeners who are interested in attending the event are eligible for a double upgrade that will give them access to all areas of the event.

LINKS & RESOURCES

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer


WILL’S LINKS & RESOURCES

Make It Happen: http://make-it-happen.co.uk/about/

Will’s Ted Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEHlSiFxmBI&feature=youtu.be

Email Make It Happen: info@make-it-happen.co.uk

The Personal Development Event of the Year: https://www.personaldevelopmenteventoftheyear.co.uk/home

Oct 29, 2018

Hearing the stories of people who have walked a similar path to the one that you’ve walked and arrived at a similar destination – or at the destination you want to arrive at – can be powerful. Today’s episode of the One Year No Beer podcast is with another One Year No Beer member, Gary Allen. 

Gary says that his relationship with alcohol was a typical one. He was born in a rural background and had a happy childhood, but he was also born with Spina Bifida, which caused him to spend some weeks or months in the hospital while he was growing up. He enjoyed English in school and focused on computer programming in college. He says that he was a late bloomer when it came to drinking, in that he didn’t start until he was 18. 

“I decided, no. I’ve had enough for a while. I’m going to take a break.” 

Gary explains that he had always been a bit shy, and alcohol helped him feel more comfortable in social situations, so he continued drinking. He met his wife and got married in his late 20s, and it was his wife who first came across One Year No Beer. Gary didn’t think much about it at first, but eventually, he decided that he’d had enough drinking. He found that he’d lost interest in things that he previously enjoyed, like reading, personal development, and writing. He felt apathetic and decided that taking a break from alcohol might be the answer. He joined One Year No Beer about 18 months ago, on August 25th, 2017. 

Gary’s alcohol-free journey wasn’t without obstacles. He had 42 days alcohol-free when he went on vacation, and his vacation was not alcohol-free. Once he returned from vacation, he had stretches of 10 or 15 days without returning to it. He decided to stop for good around New Year’s Day, but only after another vacation. So on January 29th, 2018, he began working on a 365-day challenge in earnest. He got involved in the Facebook group and also did a Mastermind.

Gary says that support from his wife was key to sticking with his challenge. He also says that it’s helped to find some non-alcoholic beers that he enjoys. Gary has seen some big changes since going alcohol-free. He’s lost weight, spends more time in the gym, and wakes up feeling more energized and motivated. He also says that it’s easier to get more done and that he feels more mental clarity. He also says that he’s planning to participate in a Spartan race next May. 

Gary says that his experience with a Mastermind group was brilliant. He especially enjoyed the weekly coaching calls and the friends that he made in the group. He says that his Mastermind group is still ongoing and that he’s made lifelong friends in that group. 

Gary is looking forward to the future. He’ll hit his 365 days in January and intends to keep the streak going. He says that he won’t say he’ll never have a drink again, but that there are no more hangovers in his future. He continues to enjoy his job in computer programming, his writing, and he’s also found a passion for coaching. Gary says that whatever his future holds, One Year No Beer will be a part of it. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

Oct 19, 2018

When things go wrong, it can be easy to turn to alcohol and use it as a crutch, especially when you’re involved in a culture that encourages and promotes drinking as a way to have fun, relax, or cope with problems. Today’s guest is a One Year No Beer member who understands what it’s like to come from a drinking culture, as well as the temptation to turn to alcohol during difficult times. 

Gareth Davies joins the podcast today to talk about his journey to One Year No Beer and what giving up alcohol has been like for him. Gareth says that he had an average British youth and that he picked up drinking culture when he started playing rugby, as well as from his parents, who often enjoyed drinking after work. Four years ago, Gareth experienced a dark time when he lost his eyesight as a result of a genetic condition. Another difficult period occurred when he went through a divorce 18 months ago. Eventually, Gareth came across One Year No Beer, thanks to a Facebook ad.

 “It’s all-encompassing. You know, my lifestyle’s improved that much.” 

At the time of this recording, Gareth has been alcohol-free for 281 days. When he joined One Year No Beer, he made a point of telling people in his life – including people at the pub that he frequented – that he was giving up alcohol for a year. He explains that now, he believes that he’s done with alcohol for good. 

During the interview, Gareth explains how drinking is hard-wired into the rugby club setting, as well as other settings like college and the military. However, he also talks about how rugby brings you in contact with so many different types of people and can be a truly positive experience. He also talks about how his life has changed since he gave up drinking. Gareth says that these days he has more confidences. He’s listening to more audiobooks, including self-help books, and he’s eating healthier food and maintaining a more plant-heavy diet. Gareth also says that he’s a better dad without the alcohol and that he’s setting a better example for his own children. 

Gareth says that it’s natural to turn to alcohol as a crutch during difficult times, such as when you’re injured or ill. However, he also says that this does not need to be a permanent condition and that once you take ownership over your own life, you can begin to accept what has happened and stop dwelling on the past. Gareth also talks about the support he’s received from One Year No Beer. He explains that with OYNB, you feel listened to and supported, not judged. Gareth encourages others to be brave, dig deep, and keep smiling. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

Oct 10, 2018

Welcome to Spartan season! Today’s episode of One Year No Beer comes to you from the Spartan Windsor races. Rather than one long interview, today you’ll get to hear from a number of different One Year No Beer members who have chosen to join this year’s Spartan races, as well as some of the Spartan staff members. We’re going to talk about what it’s like to participate in the Spartan races, the sense of achievement it can bring, and how lives have been changed by One Year No Beer. Listen to the episode to hear Ruari interview various Spartan attendees. 

During today’s episode, you’ll hear from Sam, a Spartan Race UK staff member. Sam says that there have been about 10,000 racers in attendance this weekend (many of whom are looking for a good non-alcoholic beer.) Sam encourages people who are thinking about trying a Spartan race but are unsure of their abilities to give it a shot because Spartan offers something for everyone. 

“Nothing will inspire me to take away the happy glow that I carry around inside of me now since being alcohol-free.” 

Carrie is a One Year No Beer member who signed up in October of last year. She signed up for the 28-day challenge to start and ended up doing 42 days. Though she had a few drinks after those 42 days, she signed up to volunteer at the Spartan races and decided that she didn’t want to be drinking alcohol while doing that, so she stopped again. She was on her 99th day alcohol-free as of this recording. 

Sarah, attending the Spartan races with her son Angus, is at about 375 days without alcohol.  Before finding OYNB, Sarah was in an unhealthy routine of drinking every single day. She explains that she also realized that when she was going out, one drink was never enough. Sarah found One Year No Beer just by searching around on the internet. She describes the difficulty that she had quitting, but also asserts that it was all worth it. She says that she never would have come to the Spartan races without One Year No Beer. Sarah recommends that others who are thinking about joining One Year No Beer start today. 

Ruari also talks to Jo, Kurt, and Jules, among others. Jo is 500 days alcohol-free, and she says that One Year No Beer has helped her find new confidence, and she’s now willing to try more new things. Kurt says that One Year No Beer helped him gain clarity and a new sense of connectedness to his family. He also says that he was nervous about trying the Spartan races, but that he had great fun and received help from the One Year No Beer members in attendance. Jules talks about her experience with going alcohol-free and describes how the posts in the One Year No Beer group helped her realize that she wasn’t alone. 

Listen to the episode to hear all of the amazing interviews at the Spartan races. Hearing One Year No Beer members talk about their experiences will give you a great sense of the fun and excitement of the activity and the sense of community among One Year No Beer members. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

Sep 17, 2018

Members of One Year No Beer may have heard about the Manchester Power-Up that’s coming up on September 22nd. Whether you’re looking to start your first alcohol-free challenge or you’ve sorted your relationship with alcohol and you’re looking to focus and improve on other aspects of your life, the Manchester Power-Up is the event for you. OYNB is excited to announce that one lucky person who attends will win a special prize – the keys to One Year No Beer. The winner will receive lifetime access to OYNB Masterminds programs, 50% off of all coaching programs, lifetime access to OYNB+ and Live Life Better, 50% off of merchandise, and more. 

While only one person will win this valuable prize, everyone who attends will have a chance to see the amazing guest speakers at the event. One of those speakers is Pat Divilly, who is joining us for today’s episode. Pat has been a guest on the One Year No Beer podcast before. He’s an author, a speaker, and a high-performance coach whose passion is helping people find new levels of purpose, passion, and fulfillment through movement and mindset. 

“I think corporate is really starting to see the value in things that I talk about.” 

Pat tells us about what he’s been up to lately, including giving talks in corporate settings and making his lessons in personal development more accessible to corporate settings. He’s also spent time mountain climbing and practicing Brazilian jiu-jitsu. Pat shares some of the things that he talks about in seminars, like mindfulness and the importance of recognizing the things that you can control, checking in with yourself and finding ways to support yourself, and understanding when you need to let certain things go. 

Pat talks about the importance of finding creative ways to use energy, and how when people don’t use their energy in creative ways, they can turn to addictive behaviors like drinking too much alcohol. Pat says that for him, Brazilian jiu-jitsu is one method of using energy in a creative way.

During the episode, you’ll also get to hear a portion of one of Pat’s one-day workshops. Pat shares a little bit about the kind of feedback that he gets at these events. He says that the people who attend his workshops can see that he lives what he speaks about, and that he makes his advice sound like common sense. 

At the Manchester Power-Up, Pat will be speaking about confidence and fear, and how this can tie in with alcohol use. People may drink when they’re experience social anxiety or feeling a lack of confidence. Pat will talk about how to find clarity, purpose, and passion, and what confidence truly is. Pat explains that it’s important to recognize the value of emotions and understand how to recognize them, own them, and use them to push yourself into positive action. 

LINKS & RESOURCES 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

Manchester Power-Up: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/event-ultimate-power-up-22-september-2018-manchester/

Pat’s Resources: 

Pat’s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PatDivillyFit/

Pat’s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/patdivilly/?hl=en

Pat’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/patdivilly?lang=en

Pat’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/pat-divilly-19343226/

Pat’s YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCinLgAm7dTz638phvl9O6YA

Jul 26, 2018

One of the best reasons to change your relationship with alcohol is that it’s an effective method of improving your health. Another way to improve your health is to change your relationship with food. Many people have found that the health benefits of going vegan, or even simply reducing how much meat they eat, can dramatically improve overall health. Going vegan is also good for animals and the planet as a whole. Today’s guest is interested in encouraging more people to give veganism a try.

Matthew Glover is the co-founder of Veganuary, a campaign that’s similar to Dry January, but for veganism. People who sign up for Veganuary get 31 emails in 31 days that help them explore the vegan lifestyle. Veganuary provides practical advice like how to stock your cupboards, where to get food and how to read labels to determine if food is really vegan, how to order vegan food in different types of restaurants, and how to deal with social situations where you may find yourself needing to answer curious questions or explain your choices. 

“If you want to target vegans, you call it vegan mayo. If you want to target the rest of the population, and the flexitarians, those people who are looking to reduce their consumption of animal products, then very much plant-based is the way to go with it.” 

Veganuary 2018 was the 5th annual Veganuary, and 168,500 people signed up to participate. Matthew estimates that if participation continues to grow at the same rate, by 2028 the entire population of the planet will be vegan for January by 2028. Veganuary isn’t limited to January alone, though. Those who are interested in taking part but who don’t want to wait until next year can sign up and get the full Veganuary experience at any time. Veganuary also has a book out called How to Go Vegan. 

In addition to helping individuals discover veganism, Veganuary engages with various businesses and corporations, like chain restaurants, food service providers, and supermarkets to help them develop vegan options and address branding issues. In today’s interview, Matthew talks about the differences in labeling food “vegan” or “plant-based” and who those labels appeal to. 

Matthew also talks about the risky business of going undercover to film the conditions at various livestock farms, dairy farms, and egg farms. Matthew and his team go at night to farms to film the conditions that the animals are being raised in, and put those videos online so that people can see and judge for themselves whether they want to support standard industry conditions and practices. 

Matthew explains that they only go to farms that are open – they don’t break in or cause damage, and in most cases, the farmers never know that they’ve been there. They also refrain from naming and shaming specific farms. Their goal is to expose standard practices that are common throughout the industry, not individual farmers. 

The goal of Veganuary is to show that going vegan doesn’t have to be scary or overwhelmingly difficult. People who are interested in the idea but still unsure can check out the Veganuary campaign to get the information they need to help them give veganism a try.

 

LINKS & RESOURCES:

 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

MATTHEW GLOVER’S LINKS:

 

Matthew Glover: https://veganuary.com/people/matthew/

 

Veganuary: https://veganuary.com/

 

How to Go Vegan: https://veganuary.com/how-to-go-vegan-book/

Jul 18, 2018

When you change your relationship with alcohol, you leave more room in your life to challenge yourself in a number of ways, and that includes physical challenges. Giving up alcohol, or even choosing to drink less, improves your body’s health and your own energy levels and can help you get ready to take on challenges that you never thought that you could before.

 

“I want to look after my body, everything from what I eat, to drink, to what I put in it. I realize alcohol’s probably the worst thing you can put in it, from a sport point of view.”

 

Today’s episode of the One Year No Beer podcast comes to you from the Spartan Races at Marston Lodge in Market Harbor. At the event, Ruari has a chance to interview two elite racers, Jack Carpenter and Luke De-Benedictis. In addition to being elite racers, Luke and Jack have their own podcast, OCR Audio, where they discuss obstacle course racing and host guests.

 

In today’s interview, Luke and Jack discuss their backgrounds and past relationships with alcohol and what led them to the realization that they needed to make a change. Luke and Jack also discuss what got them into racing in the first place.

 

At the race, Ruari, Luke, and Jack visit the One Year No Beer tent, where Rurai challenges Luke and Jack to test their strength with the high striker. You can see how well they did by watching the Facebook video on the One Year No Beer Facebook page.

 

Luke and Jack offer advice for people who are interested in getting into racing and sprinting, but worry that they may not be up for the challenge. They also discuss some of their own races and the challenges that each of them has faced along the way. Listen to the episode to hear what comes next for Luke and Jack.

 

LINKS & RESOURCES:

 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

Luke De-Benedictis and Jack Carpenter’s LINKS:

 

OCR Audio Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/ocr-audio/id1349290885?mt=2

 

Luke De-Benedictis Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lukedeben/?hl=en

 

Jack Carpenter Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spartan_jacked/?hl=en

 

 

Jul 13, 2018

When you consider giving up drinking, it’s easy to think about the things that you believe you’ll be losing, like nights out with friends or the social confidence that alcohol can help bolster. But not only do you not necessarily have to lose those things, it’s important to also think about the things that you can gain from an alcohol-free life. There are many benefits to changing your relationship with alcohol, but often people don’t discover these benefits until after they take the plunge. Today’s guest gave up alcohol in October, and in today’s interview, he’ll share some of the benefits he’s discovered. 

Tommy Vilés is a UK- based actor and model. He’s appeared in several movies, won international awards, and has represented several major brands as a model. He’s self-taught and has been working his way up in the industry on his own. Tommy discovered One Year No Beer through the podcast. Listening to a One Year No Beer interview led him to start thinking more about his own drinking. 

“I was thinking, financially, how much money have I actually spent on alcohol? And I was just miffed. I thought, thousands and thousands and thousands of pounds.” 

Tommy says that spent the years between the ages of 18 and 22 going out to clubs a lot, and would often experience anxiety before going out and drinking because he knew how he’d feel the next day. He started thinking about how much money he spent on alcohol and what other kinds of things he could have been doing with that money instead. 

Since giving up alcohol, Tommy has noticed that he has more energy and that his moods are more stable and consistent than they were when he was drinking. He also talks about saving time, because he spends the time that he previously would have spent drinking or recovering from drinking doing more productive activities. Tommy notes that humans are pack animals and tend to do things that others in the pack are doing, which can lead to drinking even if you don’t really want to. However, One Year No Beer provides an alternative kind of pack.

According to Tommy, giving up alcohol has led to a period of self-development for him. He reads more than he used to, and is currently interested in reading books that are helping to improve his financial development. This is one way that giving up alcohol is more than just giving up a bad habit – it also opens the door to develop new good habits.

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/ 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/ 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/ 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

Tommy Vilés’ LINKS: 

Website: https://www.tommyviles.com/ 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tommyviles/ 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tommyveeactor

Jun 14, 2018

One of the things that people worry about when they consider giving up drinking is what they’re going to drink at events, at bars with friends, and even with dinner. What do you do when you want the taste of an alcoholic drink, but without the alcohol? 

Nonalcoholic beers have been around for some time, but many people avoid them. There’s a perception that nonalcoholic beers just don’t taste as good as the real thing, but even if that weren’t the case, many people feel that there’s a stigma attached to ordering a nonalcoholic beer. But what if that weren’t the case? What if there was a nonalcoholic beer that was associated with cool people, great flavor, and a healthy lifestyle? Is it possible that people would be more willing to change their relationship with alcohol if they knew that a popular and great-tasting alternative existed? That’s what William Shufelt is trying to find out with his business, the Athletic Brewing Company. 

“The biggest risk in my life wasn’t doing this and moving on this, the biggest risk was not doing anything and potentially leaving the one time I could have a positive impact on the world on the sidelines.” 

William quit drinking alcohol six months before he got married. However, that didn’t stop him from wanting good nonalcoholic drinks. He describes being in Jamaica and walking to dinner with his wife, talking about the lack of good drink options that the restaurant they were headed to would have. That’s when it struck him that he should try his hand at making a good craft beer that was nonalcoholic. And with his wife’s encouragement, William got started right away. 

The process wasn’t without its obstacles. William describes hitting a plateau in the progress on his brewery business. He explains that he was nervous about giving up a steady job in order to pursue this goal. However, William also says that his market research had a lot of momentum, and eventually he got past his fears and moved ahead with the project. 

William talks about the work that went into creating his company’s nonalcoholic brew. He explains that the alcohol in nonalcoholic beer is traditionally burnt off at the back end, which damages the quality of the beer. He did extensive research to find out if it was possible to burn the alcohol off on the front end of the process instead, and eventually concluded that it could probably be done. 

William made the decision to partner with a skilled brewer from New Mexico. They raised more money than they expected to raise, and with the help of their investor team, grew the plans for the brewery by about three times what was originally intended. They broke ground on the brewery on January 1st, and they’re now preparing for a national launch. Over the summer, William and his team will be attending Ironman races, marathons, and other events to promote their beer. 

Listen to the episode to hear more about William and the Athletic Brewing Company, and about how William plans to use his brewery and premium nonalcoholic beer to make a difference in the world. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

WILLIAM SHUFELT’S LINKS: 

Athletic Brewing Company: https://www.athleticbrewing.com/

Athletic Brewing Company Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/athleticbrewing/

Athletic Brewing Company Twitter: https://twitter.com/AthleticBrewing

Email William: Bill@athleticbrewing.com

 

May 31, 2018

People often find that when they give up alcohol, their sleep improves. They get more sleep or more restful sleep than they got while they were drinking. However, there’s always room for improvement. If you’re still not feeling rested or you struggle with getting as much sleep as you think you should, you may need to optimize your sleeping habits. Today’s guest knows a lot about sleep, and some of it might surprise you. 

Nick Littlehales is a sports sleep coach and the author of the book Sleep: The Myth of 8 Hours, the Power of Naps... and the New Plan to Recharge Your Body and Mind. Nick didn’t set out to be a sleep coach. He originally wanted to be a professional sportsman, and did spend some time working as a golf pro at a club. However, eventually, he got married and started a new career in furniture sales. Nick spent his time traveling and selling beds to retailers. As he rose through the ranks in his career, he had the opportunity to visit a number of different countries and learn about the different ways people sleep. In today’s interview, Nick explains how he made the jump from selling beds to providing sleep coaching services for Manchester United. 

“Sleep is all about the sun going around the planet. It’s all about patterns, rhythms, and harmony.” 

Nick explains how he helped the players he worked with improve their sleep with sleep kits. He would go so far as to replace items in hotels where the players were staying if the hotel’s bedding wasn’t suitable for the needs of the players he worked with. And his methods worked. Players were able to recover and heal more effectively from injuries because they were getting more and better sleep. 

Nick also explains that sleep is about patterns and rhythms. He says that it’s important to have routines, and to wake and sleep at the same time every day. Sleep itself can be broken down into 90-minute cycles. Nick explains that not everyone should get up or sleep at the same type of day. Different people have different chronotypes – times of the day when they most need sleep or need to be awake. Some people really do benefit from getting up later in the day, while other people are at their best when they wake up early. What’s more, he says, not all of your sleep cycles have to happen in one long eight-hour block. 

Nick also points out that uninterrupted sleep all night long is a relatively recent innovation anyway. Until the invention of electric lights, it was common for people to sleep in shorter shifts with periods of wakefulness in-between. He contends that sleeping for eight hours at a stretch is unnatural, and that’s why so many people find it difficult to do. 

Getting better, more restful sleep is an important factor in improving your health and quality of life, just like changing your relationship with alcohol. Tune in to this episode to hear Nick’s story and to learn more about how you can optimize your own sleep. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

NICK LITTLEHALES’ LINKS:

Nick’s Website: https://www.sportsleepcoach.com/

Nick’s Book: https://www.amazon.com/Sleep-Myth-Hours-Power-Recharge-ebook/dp/B01ISFAU1W

May 25, 2018

One barrier to giving up drinking is the feeling that you’re being asked to stop doing something you like. But another way to look at it is that you’re challenging yourself to try a new way of doing things. It may be difficult at first, but when you’ve done it, you’ll have new skills and achievements to add to your list of accomplishments. If you’re the sort of person who relishes rising to a challenge, this can be a helpful way to think about things. 

Today’s guest knows something about rising to challenges. Grant “The Axe” Rawlinson is a former rugby player. Rugby can be a rough sport, and making it in that sport is a challenge in and of itself. But when Grant’s rugby days came to an end as a result of an injury, it didn’t stop him from taking on new challenges. 

Grant began to pursue other challenging activities, like mountaineering and human-powered travel, which includes activities like kayaking across oceans and cycling across large land masses. He prefers to work with small teams and with as little outside support as possible. In addition to these physical challenges, Grant has also built his own business. He’s a motivational speaker who also runs decision-making workshops. 

“One thing I really enjoy about the not drinking is the mental strength that it gives you.” 

During today’s episode, Grant talks about his various adventures in mountaineering and human-powered travel. He also explains how he ended up on his own alcohol-free journey. After washing up on the shore in Australia during bad weather near the end of a long-planned and expensive human-powered journey to New Zealand, Grant found himself with some important decisions to make. The latest adventure had left him nearly broke. He had an offer to go back to the corporate world, but he also had a desire to start his own business. 

During this time, Grant decided that he couldn’t afford the loss of time and energy that came with drinking. He describes himself as a binge-drinker – someone who wouldn’t miss alcohol if he went a few days without drinking, but who would be the last one to leave the bar if he did go out to drink. Grant explains that when he gave up drinking, his productivity went through the roof. 

Grant also describes some of the other benefits to giving up alcohol. It allows him to spend more quality time with his children, and it also gives him another challenge to tackle. Avoiding alcohol gives him another way to push himself and build mental strength, similar to the way you can build physical strength by pushing yourself. Listen to the episode to hear more about Grant’s adventures. 

LINKS & RESOURCES:

 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

GRANT RAWLINSON’S LINKS:

 

Grant’s Adventure Blog: https://axeoneverest.com/

 

Grant’s Public Speaking Site: https://www.powerful-humans.com/

May 16, 2018

One of the big problems with alcohol is that it seems so normal, acceptable, and even expected for you to drink in certain situations that it can become a routine part of your everyday life without you really realizing the importance that it’s come to have for you. When this happens, it can be easy to lose control over your relationship with alcohol, and end up with the alcohol controlling you. 

Alcohol is not the only thing that can wind up assuming this place of power in your life gradually over time. If you’re alcohol-free but still feel like your time is not your own, it may be time to consider another relationship in your life – your relationship with your smartphone, your email inbox, or your computer. In today’s episode, I talk to Laura Willis, Founder of Shine Offline, about how technology can end up running your life if you let it, and how being more mindful of the way you use technology can help you take back control of your life. 

“By making some small behavioral changes you can make sure that you’re in control, rather than feeling like this technology’s controlling you.” 

Laura talks about how she became interested in the subject of how technology can begin to have too much of a hold over your life. She talks about her own experiences with habitually checking the phone and watching others use apps mindlessly, without really thinking about it. She points out that while we know a lot about the negative effects of alcohol and the dangers of alcohol addiction, less is known about the possible dangers of overusing technology and the negative effects of smartphone or internet addiction. There’s more to learn about the possible long-term effects of the way we are currently using technology. 

Laura explains that Shine Offline isn’t about giving up your smartphone or other technology, just about being more mindful with it. Much like One Year No Beer is about changing your relationship with alcohol, not necessarily giving it up entirely, Shine Offline is about changing your relationship with technology. She also notes that while connectivity is necessary in business and can be useful in education, business leaders and teachers should give some thought to the way that they expect their employees or students to use technology, and ensure that those practices are more helpful than harmful. Laura believes that technology overuse can contribute to burnout at work, and that guiding teenagers toward using devices for schoolwork can lead to them in the direction of spending too much time on less productive and more addictive digital pursuits. Listen to the episodes to hear more of what Laura has to say about smartphones, technology, and mindfulness. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB’s Upcoming LIVE Event: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/oynb-ultimate-power-up-connect-collaborate-and-inspire-tickets-43896742338

 

LAURA WILLIS’S LINKS:

 

Laura Willis: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurawillisshine/

 

Shine Offline: https://shineoffline.com/

 

May 9, 2018

Many people don’t dive right into binge drinking. It can start out as infrequent or moderate social drinking before eventually becoming heavier and heavier, and before you know it, your drinking can slip out of your control. What happens when you start to take back that control? That’s what One Year No Beer helps people do. Today’s guest is here to talk about the process of taking back control and how that feels. 

Tom Kiely, of Western Australia, is a One Year No Beer member who has recently finished his 90-day challenge. In our conversation today, Tom explains some of the drinking culture in Australia. The legal drinking age is 18, and there is a heavy drinking culture where binge drinking and clubbing is common. Tom started drinking when he was 16, but got into it more heavily when he was 18 and at university, where weekend clubbing is more common. Eventually, he found that it had become more than just a social thing, and that he was drinking too much and sometimes even alone. 

Tom describes feeling that he wanted to take back control over his relationship with alcohol. He discovered One Year No Beer through another podcast, and spent a lot of time looking over the website and considering whether or not he could commit to it. He describes worrying that if he wasn’t drinking, he wouldn’t be as social and would be thought of as boring. Eventually, he decided to take the plunge. 

“I think the biggest thing early for me was just persistence.” 

Tom describes the challenges and experiences that he had when first abstaining from alcohol. He says that he read books and articles to build confidence and willpower, and also that he found a lot of help and support on the One Year No Beer Facebook group and forums. He also explains that it wasn’t just getting help and advice from other members that motivated him. Realizing that he could contribute to the group as well by sharing his own experiences and advice was also helpful for him. 

Tom talks about the way that giving up drinking made him feel. He says that he felt less anxious and more mentally healthy, and just happier overall. Tom works at the Department of Health by day, but is also part of a band, and he’s done at least 3 gigs during his 90-day challenge. Despite the fact that these gigs take place in environments where alcohol consumption is common, Tom says that abstaining, if anything, improved the experience, and his band released a CD during this period. 

Having finished his challenge, Tom says he intends to continue abstaining for now. He says that he would like to pursue a Mastermind course and continue spending time in the ONYB forums contributing to the group. Listen to the episode to hear Tom’s full story. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/ 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/ 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/ 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

TOM KIELY’S LINKS: 

Tom’s Band, Patient Sixty-Seven: https://patientsixtyseven.bandcamp.com/ 

Patient Sixty-Seven’s Album, Four Walls:

https://patientsixtyseven.bandcamp.com/album/four-walls

 

 

May 3, 2018

Giving up alcohol can feel like an isolating proposition, especially if most activities with your friend group revolve around drinking and you don’t know anyone else who is trying to abstain. Groups like One Year No Beer help by providing a community where people who are trying to change their relationships with alcohol can find others who are in the same place that they are, and be inspired by others who have been where they are. Today’s guest is one of those group members. 

Lucinda Carney has been a member of One Year No Beer for 112 days. And while she’s the first to admit that those 112 days haven’t been perfect, she has managed to significantly change her own relationship with alcohol in that time. In today’s interview, Lucinda explains her background and her previous history with alcohol. She describes herself as someone who’d been a big drinker since her late teens or early 20s, and says that she was also part of a group of friends who drank heavily at social events. She also says that the stress of building a business contributed to her drinking. 

“I certainly didn’t realize that alcohol was making me anxious until I stopped.” 

Lucinda talks about her decision to join One Year No Beer and how she found help and support on the One Year No Beer Facebook forums. She describes learning about the triggers that made her want to drink, and the substitutes that she found helpful, like drinking kombucha tea or diet Coke out of a wine glass. She also talks about how her husband is now drinking less as well, and how her kids are happier with her thanks to her new approach to drinking. Lucinda points out that she hasn’t abstained completely for the entire 112 days that she’s been a member of One Year No Beer, but that she’s certainly been drinking far less than she would have without One Year No Beer. 

Lucinda talks about the importance of not putting too much pressure on yourself, and setting yourself up to succeed instead of fail. She talks about surrounding herself with people who won’t put her in situations where the question of drinking will come up, and how to put alcohol in its place. Lucinda also gives some important tips for getting through the early days of an alcohol-free challenge, like setting small goals and giving alcohol-free alternatives a shot. She describes how her quality of life has changed since she began changing her relationship with drinking. Tune into the episode to hear more of Lucinda’s story. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/ 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/ 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/ 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

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