Info

One Year No Beer | Hack your healthy Lifestyle

The OneYearNoBeer Podcast will inspire you to take, or support your journey on a 30, 90 & 365 day challenge to stop drinking and focus on healthy habits.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
One Year No Beer | Hack your healthy Lifestyle
2019
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: May, 2018
May 31, 2018

People often find that when they give up alcohol, their sleep improves. They get more sleep or more restful sleep than they got while they were drinking. However, there’s always room for improvement. If you’re still not feeling rested or you struggle with getting as much sleep as you think you should, you may need to optimize your sleeping habits. Today’s guest knows a lot about sleep, and some of it might surprise you. 

Nick Littlehales is a sports sleep coach and the author of the book Sleep: The Myth of 8 Hours, the Power of Naps... and the New Plan to Recharge Your Body and Mind. Nick didn’t set out to be a sleep coach. He originally wanted to be a professional sportsman, and did spend some time working as a golf pro at a club. However, eventually, he got married and started a new career in furniture sales. Nick spent his time traveling and selling beds to retailers. As he rose through the ranks in his career, he had the opportunity to visit a number of different countries and learn about the different ways people sleep. In today’s interview, Nick explains how he made the jump from selling beds to providing sleep coaching services for Manchester United. 

“Sleep is all about the sun going around the planet. It’s all about patterns, rhythms, and harmony.” 

Nick explains how he helped the players he worked with improve their sleep with sleep kits. He would go so far as to replace items in hotels where the players were staying if the hotel’s bedding wasn’t suitable for the needs of the players he worked with. And his methods worked. Players were able to recover and heal more effectively from injuries because they were getting more and better sleep. 

Nick also explains that sleep is about patterns and rhythms. He says that it’s important to have routines, and to wake and sleep at the same time every day. Sleep itself can be broken down into 90-minute cycles. Nick explains that not everyone should get up or sleep at the same type of day. Different people have different chronotypes – times of the day when they most need sleep or need to be awake. Some people really do benefit from getting up later in the day, while other people are at their best when they wake up early. What’s more, he says, not all of your sleep cycles have to happen in one long eight-hour block. 

Nick also points out that uninterrupted sleep all night long is a relatively recent innovation anyway. Until the invention of electric lights, it was common for people to sleep in shorter shifts with periods of wakefulness in-between. He contends that sleeping for eight hours at a stretch is unnatural, and that’s why so many people find it difficult to do. 

Getting better, more restful sleep is an important factor in improving your health and quality of life, just like changing your relationship with alcohol. Tune in to this episode to hear Nick’s story and to learn more about how you can optimize your own sleep. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

NICK LITTLEHALES’ LINKS:

Nick’s Website: https://www.sportsleepcoach.com/

Nick’s Book: https://www.amazon.com/Sleep-Myth-Hours-Power-Recharge-ebook/dp/B01ISFAU1W

May 25, 2018

One barrier to giving up drinking is the feeling that you’re being asked to stop doing something you like. But another way to look at it is that you’re challenging yourself to try a new way of doing things. It may be difficult at first, but when you’ve done it, you’ll have new skills and achievements to add to your list of accomplishments. If you’re the sort of person who relishes rising to a challenge, this can be a helpful way to think about things. 

Today’s guest knows something about rising to challenges. Grant “The Axe” Rawlinson is a former rugby player. Rugby can be a rough sport, and making it in that sport is a challenge in and of itself. But when Grant’s rugby days came to an end as a result of an injury, it didn’t stop him from taking on new challenges. 

Grant began to pursue other challenging activities, like mountaineering and human-powered travel, which includes activities like kayaking across oceans and cycling across large land masses. He prefers to work with small teams and with as little outside support as possible. In addition to these physical challenges, Grant has also built his own business. He’s a motivational speaker who also runs decision-making workshops. 

“One thing I really enjoy about the not drinking is the mental strength that it gives you.” 

During today’s episode, Grant talks about his various adventures in mountaineering and human-powered travel. He also explains how he ended up on his own alcohol-free journey. After washing up on the shore in Australia during bad weather near the end of a long-planned and expensive human-powered journey to New Zealand, Grant found himself with some important decisions to make. The latest adventure had left him nearly broke. He had an offer to go back to the corporate world, but he also had a desire to start his own business. 

During this time, Grant decided that he couldn’t afford the loss of time and energy that came with drinking. He describes himself as a binge-drinker – someone who wouldn’t miss alcohol if he went a few days without drinking, but who would be the last one to leave the bar if he did go out to drink. Grant explains that when he gave up drinking, his productivity went through the roof. 

Grant also describes some of the other benefits to giving up alcohol. It allows him to spend more quality time with his children, and it also gives him another challenge to tackle. Avoiding alcohol gives him another way to push himself and build mental strength, similar to the way you can build physical strength by pushing yourself. Listen to the episode to hear more about Grant’s adventures. 

LINKS & RESOURCES:

 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

GRANT RAWLINSON’S LINKS:

 

Grant’s Adventure Blog: https://axeoneverest.com/

 

Grant’s Public Speaking Site: https://www.powerful-humans.com/

May 16, 2018

One of the big problems with alcohol is that it seems so normal, acceptable, and even expected for you to drink in certain situations that it can become a routine part of your everyday life without you really realizing the importance that it’s come to have for you. When this happens, it can be easy to lose control over your relationship with alcohol, and end up with the alcohol controlling you. 

Alcohol is not the only thing that can wind up assuming this place of power in your life gradually over time. If you’re alcohol-free but still feel like your time is not your own, it may be time to consider another relationship in your life – your relationship with your smartphone, your email inbox, or your computer. In today’s episode, I talk to Laura Willis, Founder of Shine Offline, about how technology can end up running your life if you let it, and how being more mindful of the way you use technology can help you take back control of your life. 

“By making some small behavioral changes you can make sure that you’re in control, rather than feeling like this technology’s controlling you.” 

Laura talks about how she became interested in the subject of how technology can begin to have too much of a hold over your life. She talks about her own experiences with habitually checking the phone and watching others use apps mindlessly, without really thinking about it. She points out that while we know a lot about the negative effects of alcohol and the dangers of alcohol addiction, less is known about the possible dangers of overusing technology and the negative effects of smartphone or internet addiction. There’s more to learn about the possible long-term effects of the way we are currently using technology. 

Laura explains that Shine Offline isn’t about giving up your smartphone or other technology, just about being more mindful with it. Much like One Year No Beer is about changing your relationship with alcohol, not necessarily giving it up entirely, Shine Offline is about changing your relationship with technology. She also notes that while connectivity is necessary in business and can be useful in education, business leaders and teachers should give some thought to the way that they expect their employees or students to use technology, and ensure that those practices are more helpful than harmful. Laura believes that technology overuse can contribute to burnout at work, and that guiding teenagers toward using devices for schoolwork can lead to them in the direction of spending too much time on less productive and more addictive digital pursuits. Listen to the episodes to hear more of what Laura has to say about smartphones, technology, and mindfulness. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/

 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/

 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/

 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

 

OYNB’s Upcoming LIVE Event: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/oynb-ultimate-power-up-connect-collaborate-and-inspire-tickets-43896742338

 

LAURA WILLIS’S LINKS:

 

Laura Willis: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurawillisshine/

 

Shine Offline: https://shineoffline.com/

 

May 9, 2018

Many people don’t dive right into binge drinking. It can start out as infrequent or moderate social drinking before eventually becoming heavier and heavier, and before you know it, your drinking can slip out of your control. What happens when you start to take back that control? That’s what One Year No Beer helps people do. Today’s guest is here to talk about the process of taking back control and how that feels. 

Tom Kiely, of Western Australia, is a One Year No Beer member who has recently finished his 90-day challenge. In our conversation today, Tom explains some of the drinking culture in Australia. The legal drinking age is 18, and there is a heavy drinking culture where binge drinking and clubbing is common. Tom started drinking when he was 16, but got into it more heavily when he was 18 and at university, where weekend clubbing is more common. Eventually, he found that it had become more than just a social thing, and that he was drinking too much and sometimes even alone. 

Tom describes feeling that he wanted to take back control over his relationship with alcohol. He discovered One Year No Beer through another podcast, and spent a lot of time looking over the website and considering whether or not he could commit to it. He describes worrying that if he wasn’t drinking, he wouldn’t be as social and would be thought of as boring. Eventually, he decided to take the plunge. 

“I think the biggest thing early for me was just persistence.” 

Tom describes the challenges and experiences that he had when first abstaining from alcohol. He says that he read books and articles to build confidence and willpower, and also that he found a lot of help and support on the One Year No Beer Facebook group and forums. He also explains that it wasn’t just getting help and advice from other members that motivated him. Realizing that he could contribute to the group as well by sharing his own experiences and advice was also helpful for him. 

Tom talks about the way that giving up drinking made him feel. He says that he felt less anxious and more mentally healthy, and just happier overall. Tom works at the Department of Health by day, but is also part of a band, and he’s done at least 3 gigs during his 90-day challenge. Despite the fact that these gigs take place in environments where alcohol consumption is common, Tom says that abstaining, if anything, improved the experience, and his band released a CD during this period. 

Having finished his challenge, Tom says he intends to continue abstaining for now. He says that he would like to pursue a Mastermind course and continue spending time in the ONYB forums contributing to the group. Listen to the episode to hear Tom’s full story. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/ 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/ 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/ 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

TOM KIELY’S LINKS: 

Tom’s Band, Patient Sixty-Seven: https://patientsixtyseven.bandcamp.com/ 

Patient Sixty-Seven’s Album, Four Walls:

https://patientsixtyseven.bandcamp.com/album/four-walls

 

 

May 3, 2018

Giving up alcohol can feel like an isolating proposition, especially if most activities with your friend group revolve around drinking and you don’t know anyone else who is trying to abstain. Groups like One Year No Beer help by providing a community where people who are trying to change their relationships with alcohol can find others who are in the same place that they are, and be inspired by others who have been where they are. Today’s guest is one of those group members. 

Lucinda Carney has been a member of One Year No Beer for 112 days. And while she’s the first to admit that those 112 days haven’t been perfect, she has managed to significantly change her own relationship with alcohol in that time. In today’s interview, Lucinda explains her background and her previous history with alcohol. She describes herself as someone who’d been a big drinker since her late teens or early 20s, and says that she was also part of a group of friends who drank heavily at social events. She also says that the stress of building a business contributed to her drinking. 

“I certainly didn’t realize that alcohol was making me anxious until I stopped.” 

Lucinda talks about her decision to join One Year No Beer and how she found help and support on the One Year No Beer Facebook forums. She describes learning about the triggers that made her want to drink, and the substitutes that she found helpful, like drinking kombucha tea or diet Coke out of a wine glass. She also talks about how her husband is now drinking less as well, and how her kids are happier with her thanks to her new approach to drinking. Lucinda points out that she hasn’t abstained completely for the entire 112 days that she’s been a member of One Year No Beer, but that she’s certainly been drinking far less than she would have without One Year No Beer. 

Lucinda talks about the importance of not putting too much pressure on yourself, and setting yourself up to succeed instead of fail. She talks about surrounding herself with people who won’t put her in situations where the question of drinking will come up, and how to put alcohol in its place. Lucinda also gives some important tips for getting through the early days of an alcohol-free challenge, like setting small goals and giving alcohol-free alternatives a shot. She describes how her quality of life has changed since she began changing her relationship with drinking. Tune into the episode to hear more of Lucinda’s story. 

LINKS & RESOURCES: 

OYNB Website: https://www.oneyearnobeer.com/ 

OYNB Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Oneyearnobeer/ 

OYNB Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/199505820380513/ 

OYNB Twitter: https://twitter.com/oynbuk/ 

OYNB Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneyearnobeer/

1